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Cdevries
07-05-2011, 12:10 PM
Thanks to: Kaisa (http://www.bonairetalk.com/forums/member.php?u=81947)

I finaly i have arange my moving from the Netherlands to Bonaire.
But now i have a new question. because a person told me that if i havent yet register me yet in Bonaire. I have to pay a deposit to get my furniture when the ship arived?

is this true, and if so what do you think i have to pay fore this deposit its not more then 9 boxses thats it.

because i move with Bo car Bonaire maby i am lucky and dont have to pay a deposit at all?

Please help me out... its a bit frustration.

I also have hear that it is verry dificult to write yourself in Bonaire as a new habitant? This this also tru? We alreay have a house and everything...

This kind of things makes the moving verry scarry

Kaisa
07-05-2011, 01:53 PM
Hi again Mr. de Vries!

Good to hear you managed to arrange your shipping!
A lot changed since I moved here almost two years ago. A lot of answers you can find on
http://www.rijksdienstcn.com/ (http://www.rijksdienstcn.com/)

When our container arrived Customs (Douane) was there to open it and checked the inside. We had to pay a certain amount of money, but nowadays I believe you only have to pay the 8% ABB on new things (I am not sure!).
After having applied for a ‘Verblijfsvergunning’ we had the chance to get our money back through customs within 6 months.
At that time it took us 5 (!) months to settle all the licences! Now it doesn’t take that long anymore…
Be sure to have arranged all the paperwork in Holland before moving here!

Good luck!

itsamugsgame
07-06-2011, 06:30 AM
Thanks to: Kaisa (http://www.bonairetalk.com/forums/member.php?u=81947)


I also have hear that it is verry dificult to write yourself in Bonaire as a new habitant? This this also tru? We alreay have a house and everything...

This kind of things makes the moving verry scarry

Hi.
You will have to register for a residency permit for you & your family. The laws change regularly on this so it maybe prudent to speak to your real estate agent. Sunbelt were very helpful for us.

I would suggest that you use a local agent to do your residency request as they know all of the rules & they speak the local language. We paid a few hundred dollars to a lady called Juli-Mar.

You need to make sure that you all have certain documents before you start.

Birth Certificates -Originals not copies
Marriage Certificate or a declaration from a notary stating marital status
A letter of good conduct from your local Police (no older than 3 months)
A medical that includes H.I.V. & Hepatitis (no older than 3 months)
A letter from your bank to confirm that you are solvent

You will also have to pay a deposit to the Government for each person. This amount varies depending on your country of origin. We are from the UK & were charged $1500 each. This is returned to you if you leave the island. Depending on your employment status, you may also need to provide your own medical insurance.

It is a bit of a mine-field & can take months. Just make sure that you contact immigration and take plenty of copies of all of your paperwork. You can contact immigration at: http://www.rijksdienstcn.com/

I am afraid that house ownership does not give you a right to live & work on Bonaire only to visit. If you are a Dutch national, you will be allowed to stay for 6 months as a visitor. In addition, the value of the house will not be taken into consideration as to your financial status.

It does sound really difficult but really it is just a paper chase. As long asyou have everything that you need & are very polite with all of the officials, you will have no problems. :)

Good luck!

Cdevries
07-07-2011, 10:58 AM
that beer offer still stands when i am finaly arive in Bonaire haha.
Fore both of you... i have a new question i make a topic of it its about my Philps ambilight TV



Hi.
You will have to register for a residency permit for you & your family. The laws change regularly on this so it maybe prudent to speak to your real estate agent. Sunbelt were very helpful for us.

I would suggest that you use a local agent to do your residency request as they know all of the rules & they speak the local language. We paid a few hundred dollars to a lady called Juli-Mar.

You need to make sure that you all have certain documents before you start.

Birth Certificates -Originals not copies
Marriage Certificate or a declaration from a notary stating marital status
A letter of good conduct from your local Police (no older than 3 months)
A medical that includes H.I.V. & Hepatitis (no older than 3 months)
A letter from your bank to confirm that you are solvent

You will also have to pay a deposit to the Government for each person. This amount varies depending on your country of origin. We are from the UK & were charged $1500 each. This is returned to you if you leave the island. Depending on your employment status, you may also need to provide your own medical insurance.

It is a bit of a mine-field & can take months. Just make sure that you contact immigration and take plenty of copies of all of your paperwork. You can contact immigration at: http://www.rijksdienstcn.com/

I am afraid that house ownership does not give you a right to live & work on Bonaire only to visit. If you are a Dutch national, you will be allowed to stay for 6 months as a visitor. In addition, the value of the house will not be taken into consideration as to your financial status.

It does sound really difficult but really it is just a paper chase. As long asyou have everything that you need & are very polite with all of the officials, you will have no problems. :)

Good luck!

Cdevries
07-07-2011, 11:02 AM
I am still not sure yet. because its a awsome tv with ambilight.
I prefer to bring my tv with me afcorse. But will it work on Bonaire?

And what can i do to let it work so it grants me the same beautyfull collers on the back of the screen and the FULL HD watching


here are some specifications
Please let me know soon because on fryday i go to Bo Car Bonaire :D

Vermogen
- omgevingstemperatuur: 5 °C tot 35 °C
- netstroom: 220 - 240 V, 50/60 Hz
- stroomverbruik in stand-bystand: < 0,15 W
- functies voor energiebesparing: aan-uitschakelaar, 0 watt, Lichtsensor, Eco-modus, Beeld uit (voor radio), Timer voor automatisch uitschakelen, Eco-instellingenmenu

power
- Ambient temperature: 5 ° C to 35 ° C
- AC: 220-240 V, 50/60 Hz
- Standby power consumption: <0.15 W
- Features energy saving power switch, 0 W, Light sensor, Eco mode, Picture mute (for radio), Off Timer, Eco Settings menu

Kaisa
07-07-2011, 11:54 AM
Hi again!

Do not know what ambilight is, but I do know that a normal television from the Netherlands can not be used here when it unly uses the PAL system. It has to have the possibility to be used as a NTSC system (which is used here on Bonaire) as well. A lot of new televisions are able to switch between both. Check those details!
I have a PAL-tv, but with a special movie box I am able to use the NTSC-system.

The electricity on Bonaire is 127 Volts, 50 cycles, although many homes have 220 Volt, 50 cycle outlets in various parts of the house. For comparison, U.S. electricity is 110-120 Volts, 60 Cycles, while Holland is 220 Volts, 50 cycles.
For Dutch appliances, you need to either plug them into a 220 Volt socket, or get a step-up transformer.

itsamugsgame
07-08-2011, 05:08 AM
Kaisa is correct on all points.

One thing that I would add is that a top of the range TV is of little use because the choice of programs etc is pretty poor.

The picture quality on many channels varies considerably & many of the programs come from American stations. As, like me, you are from Europe, you won't be used to a 90 minute film lasting 3 hours because of all of the commercials. In the last 30 minutes of a film, ads are shown every 10 minutes. I lost the will to live on more than one occasion. You will find that TV will become a lot less important than it is in Europe.

On the subject of voltage, the majority of what you can buy on Bonaire is made for the American market (110v/120v). The 127v that Bonaire supplies fluctuates drastically, sometimes up to 150v. Add to that the different cycles & you will find that many small appliances go kaput very quickly. In addition, many places (such as Bonaire Stupid Store) sell crappy goods made in China. They might be cheap but they are rubbish.
I would suggest that for all of your big appliances, use 220v. Make sure that you have surge protectors in place, many locals will be able to tell you stories of watching all of their appliances go bang, especially after a power outage.

ruth
07-08-2011, 03:45 PM
TV commercials will drive you nuts, and picture quality from the local providers is mediocre--I rarely watch "live" TV shows, (although my husband frequently watches the Dutch channels from Telbo/MiTV), or movies anymore-instead I have a Netgear "Push to TV" device http://www.netgear.com/home/products/hometheater/media-players/PTV2000.aspx (http://www.netgear.com/home/products/hometheater/media-players/PTV2000.aspx) so I can wirelessly use a site on my computer, to watch a show on my TV (commercial free). HDMI cables from your computer to TV will do the same. This site works for me, there are many out there: www.watchseries.eu (http://www.watchseries.eu)

Everything else said is true-surge protectors on ALL items, don't think any appliance will last its normal lifespan, especially if it has a motor (nothing with an electric timer/clock will work correctly)-and never turn things back on immediately after a power outtage, because that's when surges are the worst.

Kaisa
07-08-2011, 03:49 PM
I now have a moviebox of Flamingo TV. No commercials! Perfect!