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bobdives
06-20-2011, 10:16 PM
From what ive been reading, the water temp is 84? I dont think I've ever dove in 84 degree water. Really ? Who can verify?

bnoij
06-20-2011, 11:00 PM
Yep...it's true...84 at the moment, all the way down to 100ft

Sandman
06-21-2011, 06:51 AM
Wow! Just did two wonderful dives here on Saturday. Air temp was a comfortable 77 and the water a balmy 59.

kob
06-21-2011, 06:56 AM
Balmy, indeed Sandman. We dove Gilboa on Sunday ... 41 degrees at 120 ft :eek:

jskouba
06-21-2011, 08:44 AM
Yes, we dove Margate Bay and North Red Beryl in the south and my computer read 83.5. My wife is snorkeling and she loves it!

PADiver
06-22-2011, 07:36 AM
I just got back from a week on the island and my dive computer said 84 at all depths. My deepest dive was 96 feet on the Hilma Hooker. As a cold water diver, this was warm enough that on some boat dives I dispensed with the wetsuit and did 2 dives in total comfort.

larry
06-26-2011, 02:12 PM
Did it change a lot in 2 wks? During the first week of June, my computer read as low as 78 and as high as 82. Most dives were 80. The 78 was real as there was a thermocline at around 50-60 ft (at Bari Reef). Differences between computers? Possibly, except that my wife's computer registered the same.

PADiver
06-27-2011, 07:58 AM
I have an Aeris dive computer (console mount) and I got 84 on every dive. Being from the northeast, I know what thermoclines are (I was in 45 degree water just yesterday, June 27) and I did not notice a significant thermocline anywhere. On the two dives I did without a wetsuit, I could detect a slight difference as I came up from say 50-55 feet to 35-40 feet but the response time on the computer was either too slow or it wasn't enough to trigger a change in the display.

bobdives
06-27-2011, 09:39 PM
No 84 yet ! 81-82 over the last 11 dives. But comfy and beautiful nonetheless ! Maybe I'll have to start a trip report !

ABC Divers
06-27-2011, 11:37 PM
By all means, do a dive report.

Strikesystems
07-05-2011, 07:42 PM
My wife and I are contemplating buying shorties (as we mostly only dive on vacation in the Caribbean and this will be our first trip to Bonaire and the ABC's area).

We would love 84 degrees at the end of August during our stay!
My question is about the water temp in August - would a shorty suffice and what is the minimum thickness I could get away with using?

tursiops
07-05-2011, 07:48 PM
My wife and I are contemplating buying shorties (as we mostly only dive on vacation in the Caribbean and this will be our first trip to Bonaire and the ABC's area).

We would love 84 degrees at the end of August during our stay!
My question is about the water temp in August - would a shorty suffice and what is the minimum thickness I could get away with using?
A shorty is fine for the temp, but not for skin protection from entries/exits, or the occasional fire coral or jelly. If a full 3mm is too warm, I wear a full 1mm. I was just in Cayman where it is even warmer than Bonaire, and a full 3mm was just fine.

I think all shorties are 2 or 3mm.

Strikesystems
07-06-2011, 12:34 AM
Thanks Mel, good thinking there. Yeah don't want to boil down there in the sun. Thanks for the heads up, we will come prepared.

DiverVince
07-06-2011, 06:14 AM
As an FYI...In the winter we use a 3 mil plus a hood, temps uaually 79-80 degrees.. Summer months 1 mil will suffice; temps 82-84. And the 1 mil is more for protection. If you plan on shore diving be sure to bring a set of hard sole boots for entry & exits, open heel fins work best.

lovethewater
07-06-2011, 09:08 PM
3mm shortie has been perfect for me on multiple trip to Bonaire-- even when water is 80-82.

lovethewater
07-06-2011, 09:10 PM
I should add that I am diving from boats. You may need more protection than shortie gives if you are diving from shore.

Strikesystems
07-06-2011, 11:46 PM
OK, yeah, thanks. I've got a nice long sleeve rash guard I like to wear while freediving. I can easily put on a shorty wetsuit over the top of it, which should help out considerably. Then all I have to negotiate is my knees to the top of my boots. Hopefully I can get it covered.

BrianL
07-07-2011, 02:30 AM
Hmm, you could avoid contact with the coral.

bobdives
07-07-2011, 07:32 AM
It's not the coral. It's the getting in and out. The entries an exits can be treacherous even for the most experienced. The terrain is uneven and slippery. I tell my friends to just let go if you fell yourself going done. It's not worth getting stuck in a whole and ending up in a cast. I see it every trip. It's not a mater of if, just when. Falling that is.

Shortys. no way for me.

It's always best to bring extra pieces when I travel so I can layer if needed. 1 mill full suit plus a shorty to put over it is not a bad idea. I've never regreted diving in a 5mil. I guess I'm a sissy.

DiverVince
07-07-2011, 11:26 AM
Hmm, you could avoid contact with the coral.
Brian..Coral is not the only problem. Sometimes depending on the time of year & wind pattern there could be single (or multi) celled stinging organisms in the water. Some folks could be hypersensitive to them. For others just a mere inconvenience. When diving, I prefer to wear an exposure suit. When swimming I'll usually just wear a rash guard or a swim trunks depending on conditions.

Strikesystems
07-07-2011, 12:23 PM
I will definitely give my uttermost effort to avoid the coral (as always). Listening to this forum on entry exits however is moving me off the shorty idea to a full. On most trips we are only boat diving - but I can see us doing a daily shore dive on Bonaire (and also boat dives). I guess that's why its nice to have such participation on a forum like this (especially for a new visitor like me). Thanks for all the input. Cheers.

scubaliz
07-07-2011, 01:32 PM
I've never regreted diving in a 5mil. I guess I'm a sissy.

No way....you're not a sissy. And definitely not alone. I wore a 4/3 mil in Bonaire in June and was never too warm. Even when my computer was registering temps in the mid 80s consistently. My wetsuit was perfect, actually. Kept me warm over two weeks of multi-dive days.

And I like the extra protection for entries/exits, especially for the East Coast in heavier surf. You never know when you are going to take a tumble - even the most experienced Bonaire shore diver stumbles once in a while. Better safe than sorry.

kob
07-07-2011, 03:46 PM
It really comes down to personal preference and temperature tolerance. I dive Bonaire in a rashguard & swmsuit at the same time my wife dives in her 5/3mm full wetsuit. Some of my students get cold in an 84 deg. pool during training and some are perfectly warm in the same pool.

Vive la difference !!

thom
07-07-2011, 06:47 PM
Wife and I dive Bonaire in swimsuits.

People dive in wetsuits, then they swim in the same water in swimsuits. I don't get it.

I've been fire-coral'd a few times. The sting lasts about 20 minutes. Jellys? I've bumped a few. Still not enough to motivate me to wear a hot wetsuit in bath-water.

scubaliz
07-07-2011, 07:07 PM
Wife and I dive Bonaire in swimsuits.

People dive in wetsuits, then they swim in the same water in swimsuits. I don't get it.

I've been fire-coral'd a few times. The sting lasts about 20 minutes. Jellys? I've bumped a few. Still not enough to motivate me to wear a hot wetsuit in bath-water.

It's great that you and your wife dive in swimsuits. I'm sure that makes gearing up much easier than sweating it out in a thick wetsuit. :) As KOB said, it's personal preference, really. Some people like thick wetsuits and some don't. There isn't much to "get" really.

But your comparison of swimming to diving is off.

When you are swimming, you are in an aerobic state and you're likely not spending much time fully underwater, mostly you're on the surface benefitting from solar heat (unless by swimming you mean standing in the shallows just milling around chatting with one another with a cocktail in your hand). When your body is in an aerobic state, your body generates heat and you need less insulation. It works the same when you run, hike or whatever....

Yes, I've gone freediving in Bonaire in January wearing only a swimsuit. But a majority of that time was spent on the surface, under the hot sun, treading water. The time spent at depth (20-30 feet max) certainly did not warrant a wetsuit.

Diving, however, involves extended periods of time at depth basically not moving much at all, with an occasional fin kick to propel yourself. Hardly aerobic and certainly not the same aerobic activity as swimming. You're definitely not generating much - if any - body heat. Unless, of course, your buoyancy sucks and you are flailing around with your arms and legs trying to avoid being a bottom-crasher.

And, last time I dove the East Side and got knocked off balance by a big wave, I was really glad I had a full-length wetsuit with reinforced knees protecting my legs. The bruise I did end up with was fairly nasty. I imagine a bare leg meeting rock would have fared much worse.

nicintime
07-10-2011, 09:19 PM
At Red Slave a few weeks ago we hit a noticeable thermocline at 100fsw or so - it was fun! Other than that, a balmy 84 degrees!

smits
07-10-2011, 10:25 PM
I dive Curacao and Bonaire since 1977. My last dive was yesterday. I've never wore more than swimming trousers and a T-shirt.
This year I upgraded from old tennis shoes to hard soled booties :-)
My 11 yr old daughter had a 4 mil suit and was shivering.