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DiveSergeant
05-30-2011, 07:35 PM
Hey All,

Does anyone know where we can rent 100 Cu Ft nitrox tanks? I'm wanting do dive 100s so I can make a tank last closer to Mrs DS who seems to have gills.

Thanks,
DS

tursiops
05-30-2011, 08:16 PM
Buddy Dive has them.

My solution is for the wife to dive 63's.:)

dreemerdog
05-31-2011, 04:11 AM
OMG - my husband once insisted we both got 'bombs' (as they are known in some parts!) for a deep, exploratory dive; nearly broke my back with all that weight, came back with well over half a tank as the 'no-deco' time got us first ; advise wife defo sticks to the mini's !!

kob
05-31-2011, 07:31 AM
DS -- Mel's advice makes good sense. On deeper dives, you will generally time out (i.e. run out of no deco time), not air out (run out of gas). So, unless you are an extremely heavy breather or plan to make very long shallow dives, take an 80 for yourself and let your wife carry a little less weight with a 63. :D It's plus or minus about 20% gas in either direction.

DiverVince
05-31-2011, 12:01 PM
DS..Personally I'd stick with the 80's. You'd be AMAZED at how much heavier a 100 is as opposed to an 80. I dove with 100's a couple of times but frankly would not do it again. I usually put my tank on by swinging it over my head. It is a much more difficult maneuver with a 100 as opposed to an 80! 80's are fine in my book! No need to go larger. :)

tursiops
05-31-2011, 07:28 PM
You'd be AMAZED at how much heavier a 100 is as opposed to an 80.
The 100s (depending on manufacturer) are maybe 15 pounds heavier than an 80!

I usually put my tank on by swinging it over my head.
Vince, as you probably know, this is no longer taught. Too many head injuries! It was a more viable technique when the tanks just had simple harnesses on them, but with modern BCDs attached there are too many things that can go wrong.:(

kob
05-31-2011, 07:41 PM
Mel -- as usual, you're correct. We don't teach it any more. :(

Too bad, though. It's really easy to do if you're putting your gear on in the water ... just open your BC in front of you, arms through the holes, duck down and flip. ;)

tursiops
05-31-2011, 08:07 PM
Mel -- as usual, you're correct. We don't teach it any more. :(

Too bad, though. It's really easy to do if you're putting your gear on in the water ... just open your BC in front of you, arms through the holes, duck down and flip. ;)
Yeah, I do it in the water now and then too! But I stopped teaching it even in the water when a guy got tangled and "trapped" underneath and it turned into a rescue class....

Walt at Rec Tek Scuba
06-01-2011, 10:25 AM
A HP Steel 119 is only 9 pounds heavier than an AL 80 and has much better buoyancy characteristics.

DiverVince
06-01-2011, 11:59 AM
Thanks Walt..So if an aluminum 80 weighs about 30 pounds, than I guess you can estimate a steel 100 is about 30% heavier. And of course the buoyancy characteristics of steel vs aluminum will probably necessitate some reduced weighting for proper buoyancy control. I still say good luck with the steel 100s. ;)

DiveSergeant
06-01-2011, 02:03 PM
Hi Everyone,

Thanks for all of the input. I have dived the 100s before and, yes, they do weigh a bit! Still, Mrs DS on an 80 and me on a 100 seem to work out well, especially with the extended times possible with nitrox.

Anyway, keep the discussion going. It is good to get a lot of different perspectives on the topic.

Yours,
DS

Walt at Rec Tek Scuba
06-01-2011, 02:43 PM
A Pressed Steel HP Steel 100 weighs 1 pound (33lb) more than an AL 80 (32lb) and is 1 pound negative empty vs 4 pounds positive for an AL 80. So you can lose 5 pounds off your weight belt for a net savings of 4 pounds. An AL 100 weighs 41 pounds and is 4 pounds positive empty.

DiverVince
06-01-2011, 06:50 PM
Oh I see I got aluminum 100s mixed up with steel 100s. Thanks for the clarification Walt. I dove 100s on Bonaire but I suspect it was aluminum.

DiveSergeant
06-02-2011, 04:24 PM
A Pressed Steel HP Steel 100 weighs 1 pound (33lb) more than an AL 80 (32lb) and is 1 pound negative empty vs 4 pounds positive for an AL 80. So you can lose 5 pounds off your weight belt for a net savings of 4 pounds. An AL 100 weighs 41 pounds and is 4 pounds positive empty.


....and I dive with between two to four pounds with AL 80s, so I will be in good shape with the steel 100s!

Ain't life great?!

Again, I really appreciate all the input from those more experienced that I.

So, is Buddy Dive the only place with the 100s, and are they the pressed steel? I know I could email them, but this is way more fun...:D

Yours,
DS

kob
06-02-2011, 04:38 PM
DS -- I am surprised that HP 100's would be available for rental. Most places shy away from renting steel bottles, due to the potential for tourists getting moisture inside, etc.

If you do plan to rent HP 100's, make sure you have a DIN first stage, as most will have a DIN valve to contain the higher pressure (3442psi or higher). At the very least (if you're feeling lucky), bring a DIN-to-yoke adapter plug for the tank valve.

Please let us know what you find out, as I would be interested when we're on island in September. I personally dive with XS Scuba (Worthington) HP 100's and really like them for all the reasons that Walt described, plus the fact that I can get about 3 dives for every one my open water students get !! :D I have also set up my regs with DIN first stages for the reason noted above.

tursiops
06-02-2011, 06:16 PM
Walt can provide you with all kinds of steel tanks and specialized stuff. Check with him directly. BD has AL 100's only, as far as I know.
- Mel

Dave
06-03-2011, 07:28 AM
My apologies to the OP as I don't have specific info about 100Cu tanks but I have to tell about a diver who was staying at Captain Dons with us last year, he insisted on diving with twin 80 cylinders underslung each arm, it took him and the attention of the DM 10 minutes prior and post each dive to get kitted up in and out, the amazing thing is he was the first to run out of air for every dive, I decided to watch him on one of the dives, his exit bubbles were like a steam train's funnel!

DiveSergeant
06-03-2011, 11:29 AM
My apologies to the OP as I don't have specific info about 100Cu tanks but I have to tell about a diver who was staying at Captain Dons with us last year, he insisted on diving with twin 80 cylinders underslung each arm, it took him and the attention of the DM 10 minutes prior and post each dive to get kitted up in and out, the amazing thing is he was the first to run out of air for every dive, I decided to watch him on one of the dives, his exit bubbles were like a steam train's funnel!

No worries. Sounds like a really high-maintenance diver; the kind you cringe at when you see them getting on your boat!

The way I see it, unless there is a real need for fancy exotic dive kit, the more bells and whistles they have, the more likely they'll need lots of attention from the DM.

Yours,
DS