Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: All That’s Down There Is A Whole Lot of Nothin’ ………… Day 6

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    114

    Default All That’s Down There Is A Whole Lot of Nothin’ ………… Day 6

    I don’t know the name of the road. Actually, I don’t really care what it’s called. It’s the one-way that runs from the north of the business district, south through town, along the ocean.

    It goes past It Rains Fishes, Karels, and The Town Pier. Fairly regularly, drivers will stop to pick up passengers, drop off passengers, or even carry on conversations with pedestrians. It’s a narrow strip of pavement with houses, apartments, and businesses on one side and the ocean on the other. It’s possibly the most congested, excruciatingly slow mile of blacktop I ever drive on.

    God, we love that road.

    We travel it as often as possible. Whenever we’re going from Sanddollar to a southern dive site, we use that road. The boats moored gently on their buoys; the sights and sounds of the people; the smell of the restaurants; the sandpipers perched on the wooden pylons ;the dempels; kids jumping off the piers into the water. It’s a potpourri for the senses.

    Unless….. Cruisers.

    “Oh no, Cruisers,” Leslie (Double l) said as we turned onto the road from the northern most entry point.

    There were two cruise ships parked neatly at the main pier. They looked big to me, but my experience with cruise ships is extremely limited. I’ve never been on one and the only ones I’ve ever seen are the ones that happen to moor at Bonaire while I’m on the island.

    “I thought I smelled them,” Double L said. “I smelled them all the way from Sanddollar.”

    Les insists that she can smell cruise people. She says they smell like a combination of sparkly t-shirts and sun tan lotion. A very distinct smell, she claims, that is as repulsive as lion fish in the Caribbean.

    It’s quite easy to distinguish the Cruisers from other tourists. Not sure my olfactory glands are quite as sensitive as Double L’s to smell them. But I recognize them when I see them. I don’t know exactly, but they just seem to wonder around more awkwardly than the diver tourists.

    With two ships in town – which has been a regular occurrence all week --the drive slowed down even more. But we didn’t really care. We weren’t in a hurry. The dive site we were headed to wasn’t going anywhere. It had been there for years. It had survived many cruise ship arrivals. We will, too. It’ll be there when we make it through the gazillion Cruisers.

    One of our dives today was at Pink Beach. Always a beautiful dive with an easy entry and plenty of soft corals. Leslie encountered some squid. They were pretty curious guys and let her snap some good photos. She also found a huge octopus hidden up under some rocks.

    Water temperature is still in the 78-79 degree range. I’m warm now, having purchased the Lava Core upper. Visibility is good, but gets very good after dropping below about 45 feet. It opens up and becomes very clear.

    Dinner tonight was some left over pork cops with mushroom gravy and Caribbean rice that I had made a few days ago. We don’t go out for dinner every night, preferring to do some in-condo cooking.

    We did venture to Rum Runners last night. Being proud Wisconsinites, Double L just had to try their version of Mac & Cheese made with blue cheese. It was good. I know because I borrowed some from her plate.

    I had the Baby Back Ribs. They were good, but not as good as mine. We’ll be back next week and try both the dishes again, just to verify consistency (as if we really care). It’s a great venue for dinning. Right along the sea and perfect for watching the sunset while having a cold one.

    Doesn’t get much better then that.

    So, allow me to proclaim that I might be jaded. Or maybe I’m what we use to call each other in high school which was “stuck up.” Or maybe I’m just plain a Bonaire snob. Could be that I’m all of those.

    But some things really get me.

    For instance, after we had geared up at Pink Beach and were walking towards the entry point, we passed some divers who had just come out of the water. At a glance, it appeared as though they had decent gear and it had obviously seen some use. They weren’t newbies.

    As Les and I passed them, one said to the other, “All that’s down there is a whole lot of nothin’.”

    Double L stopped. She looked at the guy, her eyes narrowed, her face reddening. I knew she wanted to have a conversation with those two misinformed divers in order to correct their opinion of what they had just experienced. I motioned to her to keep walking and asked her to let it go. Let’s just do our dive. Nothing is ever solved by that kind of intervention -- even when it feels so strongly there should be one.

    Some years ago, our good buddy, John “Smack” Anderson, of BonaireTalk fame, said to me, “Aren’t you glad, Dave, that you’re one of the ones who gets it?”

    After hearing that diver’s comments, then – not surprisingly -- experiencing the magic and beauty of the dive at Pink Beach, yes, I’m absolutely glad that we’re some of the ones who “get it.”

    And sadly, I pity those who don’t.

    Dive on Friends.

    Dave & Leslie.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Re: Plenty of Nothing- Ha! I can only imagine what those types would think about a full day up in the more desolate areas of the Park.

    Favorite Pink Beach memory: Surfacing from a dive just as a large flock of Flamingos arrived from Venezuela, an improbable wave of pink and black capping off a perfect day.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,174

    Default

    Joy to read Dave as always and yes I get it.
    And Jerry said, Keep it light, Keep it friendly. Post Like Jerry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    68

    Default

    “All that’s down there is a whole lot of nothin’.”

    Dave, next time you hear that, do as I would do. Laugh so hard you begin to cry! They will always wonder why but never know.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,104

    Default

    Keep them coning Dave. I always enjoy your narration.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Albuquerque New Mexico
    Posts
    163

    Default

    You really don't know what they meant. I've been doing two weeks in Bonaire every September for 25 years. What was very obvious in Sept 2016 was that the sponges were in very bad shape. Most were gone. The corals were also in bad shape though not as bad as the sponges. The fish were doing pretty well. So, what they meant had a lot to do with their history. Most people seem to miss the shallows at pink beach, toward the salt works from the entry. The blennys there are a lot of fun. There is a lot of life in that small shallow area. You gotta think small.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati Ohio
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Two things made me smile at your (Dave n Leslie) post (with you not against) especially the observation about the folks who saw a lot of "nothin". The Blennies and Gobies are as good as it gets. If a diver learns to identify a couple dozen of these guys they will never be disappointed. Nothing like watching for a Sailfin Blenny to show off in his nano second. How about Yellow headed Jawfish with eggs in the mouth? The neat stuff is not about waiting to see a Manta because they are few and far in between, but plenty of neat stuff down there.

    As for the Cruise ships a few years ago we were eating lunch with another dive buddy couple at the park in town and yes, in uniform (smelly suits and stinky booties) and our wives overheard a couple of women from a cruise ship say "why did they bring us to this God forsaken island"? Why rejoiced! Go tell the Captain and don't come back!

    Rum Runners is as good as any and the staff are greats folks. We are heading there April 29th for our 34th trip in only 14 years. Still waiting for the "green flash".
    Last edited by dustcap; 04-04-2017 at 07:26 PM. Reason: left word out

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dustcap View Post
    Two things made me smile at your (Dave n Leslie) post (with you not against) especially the observation about the folks who saw a lot of "nothin". The Blennies and Gobies are as good as it gets. If a diver learns to identify a couple dozen of these guys they will never be disappointed. Nothing like watching for a Sailfin Blenny to show off in his nano second. How about Yellow headed Jawfish with eggs in the mouth? The neat stuff is not about waiting to see a Manta because they are few and far in between, but plenty of neat stuff down there.

    As for the Cruise ships a few years ago we were eating lunch with another dive buddy couple at the park in town and yes, in uniform (smelly suits and stinky booties) and our wives overheard a couple of women from a cruise ship say "why did they bring us to this God forsaken island"? Why rejoiced! Go tell the Captain and don't come back!

    Rum Runners is as good as any and the staff are greats folks. We are heading there April 29th for our 34th trip in only 14 years. Still waiting for the "green flash".

    Yep! Dive safe. Enjoy Mother Ocean!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dustcap View Post
    our wives overheard a couple of women from a cruise ship say "why did they bring us to this God forsaken island"?
    I don't mean to judge 'cruise ship people' or anything like that, but I suspect many, when not on the boat never want to venture beyond the very touristy shopping area. There are all manner of activities to partake in when you get off a cruise ship, some you can of course book ahead and either way enough that will get you out on the island and Bonaire is no different...but some just don't want to do that. For those that don't, Bonaire probably isn't for them. Not that there isn't anything here for them because yes there are indeed trinket shops, jewelers , coffee shops and a place to eat if they can pull themselves away from the ships all you can eat deal. But I suspect the problem is that they were actually hoping to dock at a strip mall, not a quaint island with quaint downtown, with activities beyond that they would never have even considered.

    It's a shame they have to knock it though, but I would contrast their opinion against the many folk re-boarding the ship who are likely saying 'did you see that water, I've never seen anything so clear and blue. I am so glad we stopped here and saw this spectacle'. For many, Bonaire is a once in a lifetime experience.
    Owner, AquaVilla @ Waterlands Village (#6)
    PADI Instructor #374823

  10. #10
    gbf is offline Bonaire Lover SUPPORTING MEMBER - Bonaire Talker
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Jackson, MS
    Posts
    181

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dustcap View Post
    Yellow headed Jawfish

    Still waiting for the "green flash".
    Yellow headed jawfish are the coolest thing going. I can watch them for a long time, just waiting for them to spit sand and pebbles out of their hole.

    and as far as the green flash goes....

    you'll probably have a conversation with the mermaid before you see one.
    Brad Ford

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •