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Thread: Ostracod Dives

  1. Default Ostracod Dives

    Several years ago I dove with Wannadive where one of their instructors led a guided Ostracod dive, where she used a UV light to stimulate the Ostracod to light up. I was told at the time by her that she contacted the marine park where they provided guidance on a monthly bases for the most likely dive site. That said she is no longer with the shop and when I was on Bonaire last year diving I was unable to find a dive site, even though I should have been at the right time during the month.

    Is there any guidance on how to locate dive sites likely to have Ostracod, or for that matter anyone that is offering guided dives at this juncture?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    438

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    One does not need a UV light to stimulate them; they do that on their own. The key is partially location but mostly the right time, which starts about 45 minutes after sunset, and continues for an hour at most, on certain days only. Those days are a day or two after the full moon for about 10 days or so. The point is it has to be dark, really dark, and your eyes need to be dark-adapted. To be dark, there can be no moon during the observing period. Tell me which days you were looking for them and I'll tell you (from sunset and moon tables) if those were good nights or not. Locations? Pretty much anywhere there is coral, from about 2-30 ft down to at least 50-60 feet. We've seen them in front of Buddy Dive and Sand Dollar, but they were spectacular at Petries' Pillar on a night boat dive. the Lake is another popular viewing spot; just about anywhere it is easy to do a really dark entry and exit.
    Mel Briscoe, Alexandria, Virginia

  3. Default

    Based upon your recommendation if I looked up the right tables then sunset tonight is 1840 and moon rise is 2240. Or about 7:30pm tonight be in the water...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    438

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strat View Post
    Based upon your recommendation if I looked up the right tables then sunset tonight is 1840 and moon rise is 2240. Or about 7:30pm tonight be in the water...
    Perfect. But give yourself 5-10 minutes of lights out to get your eyes dark-adapted.
    Mel Briscoe, Alexandria, Virginia

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    438

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    @strat How did your dive go?
    Mel Briscoe, Alexandria, Virginia

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5

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    I'll concur with Tursitop, you don't need a UV light to fire up the ostrocods, but the UV could come handy to adapt your eyes.

    I did a UV night dive with VIP Diving on September 1st, 2016, which was about 12 days after the full moon. As you know, the amber filter you wear on our visor diminishes visibility significantly and this one of the darkest--but spectacular--night dives I've done.

    On our way back to the buoy, Josh, the dive guide, instructed me to remove the filter from my visor and turn the UV lights off. He then proceeded to do a sweep with his regular and voila! Ostrocods!

    We spent the rest of the dive with the ostrocods. What a breathtaking experience. Josh told me that it was rather unusual since it was almost two weeks after full moon. I was quite fortunate I guess.

    I wish you a happy and safe dive.

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